Work in Progress: Intentional Printing table runner

Here is yesterday’s progress on the table runner Project from Lynn Krawczyk’s book, “Intentional Printing.” There is still plenty of time of US readers to leave a comment on the previous post for a chance to win your own copy.

imageExcept it isn’t going to run down the table, it will be square to work as a really giant hot pad on my square dining room table? What does one call a square table runner? (Leave a comment and tell me!)

imageBut of course then I had to go and add some more circular elements. The lid of my countertop compost container was the perfect size for printing some high contrast (opaque white) circles.

imageI chose not to print the red cloth, leaving it as a strong linear element to offset the dominant looniness of the printed circles and written words. Next up – stitching. More linear to contrast with such strong circular elements.

 

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Comments

  1. Gloria Bowers says:

    To keep it artistic, just call it a stabile. It worked for Calder.
    I love the red with the contrasting fabrics.
    It’s great to watch it develop.

  2. My most memorable mistake was with the 2008 Kaufman Quilt Quest Challenge. I miss understood the directions/requirements of the challenge and made assumptions. I got the fabric had a really cool design and proceeded to cut the pieces and put it together – orange and purple grape shapes hanging from a wall. Then I went back and reread the instructions for some reason and to my horror I was to use a “traditional block”. The word traditional through me off and I literally thought it had to be a block with a traditional pattern. Well, hell, my collage of seemingly grape like shapes contrasting against a variety of stripped rectangles varying in sizes was not a traditional block! Soooo, I bought some more fabric and selected the card-trick block and came up with a pleasing composition and added a little nature to it by intertwining green ivy by appliqué The card-trick block is a combination of triangles sewn together to give an illusion BUT it is a “traditional block” so all the corners had to match perfectly. (By the way, I had not taken a traditional quilting class yet-I assumed I could figure out how to sew triangles together – what is so hard about that? Well, after ripping out little triangles for seemingly the 100th time I finally completed the card-trick pattern with a lot of verbal abuse directed at my quilt. I now have a pieced quilt top using a traditional quilt block. For some reason, I went back and reread the instructions, to my horror again, I realized that a traditional block could be a plain block with any design in it, so I could have used my original design after all! I was not a happy camper but then started to laugh at myself and sat back and realized I had learned an awful lot – true, it could have been a lot easier but not as memorable. Nothing is as simple as it seems, read the instructions/challenge requirements and make sure you understand them, if not, ask someone to explain them to you-preferably an experienced quilter and do a little reading on a technique that has been tried, tested, and works rather than trying to guess how it is done-read, listen, and follow the instructions for a challenge. I now know what a 1/4″ seam is and that little bit off turns into a big bit off after a couple of squares. I know the card trick block inside and out and I don’t want to do it again. I have an incredible amount of respect for those talented and precision conscious artists that do traditional piecing, especially in such large formats as queen size quilts. “Twice Over Lesson Learned” did not win but was juried into the show that traveled the country for a year. The winning piece was an appliqué of a pelican – beautiful, but my question was “where is the traditional block”?

  3. Fabulous – I love it!
    A ‘squnner’????

  4. Love this piece!!! I’m waiting for Lynn’s book to arrive mid month! I have the ebook but can’t get into reading it on the laptop!! I need that book in my hand!!!

  5. It’s table art! Loving it! I should have my book tomorrow… Can’t wait!

  6. Bethany Garner says:

    Hi Lyric…Well there is the “Square-pants” term, so why not “awesome square-pad”… and maybe not. Love the idea of having the printed square for the centre of the dining table. With your inspiration, I have one underway now for my old oak table.
    Bethany in Michigan

  7. Just wonderful to watch this progress. Must get some paint out and work along with you!

  8. I love how your table topper is turning out. The white circles add just enough POP. I love Lynn’s book and the hop has confirmed what I expected – everyone takes an idea and runs with it. Lynn is going to spread paint flinging worldwide. Have a wonderful week!

  9. This is wonderful! I really like how the red divides while the white circles bring it all together!
    Sandy in the UK

  10. I combined two runners also so that I would have a giant hot pad! Should finish it today or tomorrow. Not sure if I will stamp or stencil an additional design on top of the quilted piece. I call it a table topper! I used regular natural cotton batting in mine, so I’ll probably need to put an additional matting under it to actually protect the table.

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