filming for quilting arts tv pt2: step outs

So how does one go from a new idea, to being ready to demonstrate it on the magic screen? With lots, and lots, and lots of work. Usually I choose to demonstrate something I am very familiar with. It’s easy to pull out all the samples and spout off the spiel that I’ve said hundreds of times while teaching.

This time however, one of the segments I proposed was a new idea. It doesn’t happen very often that I get a new idea, all nice and shiny and fresh. I mostly teach techniques so coming up with a project isn’t my usual mode of operation. And while the technique is familiar to me, this new project has me ALL excited!

Guess what folks! I’m going to make some patterns!

You’ve heard the term “learning curve” before, right? Well here I am at the beginning of a roller coaster of a learning curve! I started with a small sketch of a celtic knot. Just choosing a couple out of the many, many, many I’ve drawn took forever. Too many to choose from. Which ones would work in cloth? Which ones are easy or hard or would look great on screen?

After a number of false starts I DID NOT choose this design for my main sample.  I personally like this one, but after a few tries thought… not for TV. And especially not in red and black. Did you know cameras really don’t like red and black? I do now.

Instead I chose this. It’s a small and fairly easy knot. Comparatively. I found a talented graphic designer who cleaned up the sketch beautifully and created a vector file that I could print at any size without losing image quality.

 

 

 

I chose commercial fabrics thinking that people would relate more to them in that “I could do that” kind of way. And really, the whole point of the demo is to show the audience that yes, they CAN do that.

Then began the work. You know when you watch a cooking show and they have all the ingredients ready to go in pretty little bowls instead of digging things out of jars and boxes? Then they put the pan in the magic oven and pull the finished product out two seconds later? It’s like that… but a little more. When showing a project for TV you need to have a “step-out” of every part of the process. In my case I only had 8-12 minutes to teach something that could take a couple hours to make at home.

So here you are seeing:

  • The pattern printed, a light box, and tracing materials
  • Fabric half fused, already fused, ready to cut, already cut
  • Cutting materials
  • Partially fused fabric, ready to arrange
  • Batting and stabilizer for the faux trapunto technique
  • Small sample to show various thread choices
  • Sample ready to show stitch techniques
  • Stitched sample, ready to cut away extra batting
  • Trapunto batting cut, ready to layer with thin batting and backing
  • Sample ready to quilt
  • Finished sample ready for shading with colored pencils.

And there you go!


Finished and ready to pull out of the magic oven sewing machine!

Tomorrow I’ll give you a peek at the other pieces I made for set dressing. Because, of COURSE I couldn’t just use one little sample, right? 

filming for quilting arts tv: ideas and preparation

I had the wonderful opportunity last week of filming for Quilting Arts TV hosted by Susan Brubaker Knapp. It’s lovely and long running show that airs on PBS stations in the United States. You’ll have to check your local station guide to find out if it runs your area.

I thought I’d give you a behind-the-scenes tour of the whole process. I know I’m always much more fascinated by the process than by the actual shows sometimes.

The process began months ago when Susan and I were chatting about the different artists she was scheduling and brainstorming ideas I might have for demos. I had to look it up, but I’ve done this gig three times before, filming at least six segments for five different seasons. I know it seems like I should remember something as big a deal as this, but my brain doesn’t work any more when it comes to timelines and numbers.

I had ideas for demos that concern things I’m very comfortable and familiar with, but I also had an idea that would use the celtic knots I’ve been drafting for several years. It’s a great idea. I love it. A month later and two weeks before the deadline when my kids finally went back to school and I could get some work done…. I was panicking! Why on earth did I choose something that I had NO samples and step-outs made for!!!!!

Tomorrow I’ll show you the behind-the-scenes preparation for this demo.

 

quilting arts TV blog hop

Welcome to the Quilting Arts TV Blog Hop! We are celebrating the start of series 1400 with a little bit of fun from most of the guests for the season. I hope you’ve had the chance to stop by lots of the other blogs to see what everyone is up to.

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This wasn’t my first time filming for the show so it was much more relaxed, knowing what to expect before I got there. The exciting part was to come in at the end of a long week of filming and watch the shows new hostess, my friend Susan Brubaker Knapp, just soaring. It’s an incredibly difficult job and she was a natural at it! (Yes, I miss Pokey, but she has other exciting things up her sleeve my friends – just you wait!!!) Don’t you love how Susan and I could be sisters? We kind of feel like we are… oh and here is some great news. We will be teaching a retreat together again next year! If you want to know more as information becomes available sign up for my newsletter. (There is a sign-up box up there on the right.)

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IMG_8492Another wonderfully fun thing is to walk into the studio and see FRIENDS! Sarah Ann Smith and Jane Sassaman filmed on the same day I did.

They film the entire season (plus a few episodes for series 15) in one week. That’s a lot of people in and out of the studio. That’s also a LOT of wardrobe changes for the hostess. They film according to when the guests can get there, not linearly, so Susan actually has a chart with pictures and notes (make sure you have the right jewelry with the right blouse) and she has to run and change between most segments. 

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Do I look a little shell shocked here? Who knows what I was doing…. probably listening to the producer, or talking. My hands are never still when I’m talking. If you want a little peek at what I’ll be showing look for Episode 1402, Groovy Gifts. I’ll be constructing a sweet little sketchbook cover. What you don’t see in this picture is that I had a stack of “step-outs.” Those are the same project repeated in various stages of completion so that you can do that magic oven thing. You know where they put the ingredients in the pan in the oven and immediately pull out the finished product?

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It’s a good thing I really like the project as I have about 8 of the finished covers now.
WANT ONE?
(you know you do!)
I’m going to give away one of the finished sketchbooks to one of YOU!

You need to leave a comment HERE telling me what and who you want to see on QATV.

I’ll pick a winner on Saturday morning – so please make sure to leave me a way to contact you.

Lyric_Art_SketchbooksAnd in case you just can’t wait
I’ve listed three of the other finished sketchbooks in my Etsy shop
available for you to purchase. 

And make sure to check out the following links for the blog hop!

July 18: Vivika DeNegre at quiltingdaily.com

July 19: Luana Rubin (luanarubin.typepad.com)/Linda Friedman (lindasartquilts.blogspot.com)

July 20: Sarah Ann Smith (sarahannsmith.com/weblog)/Karen Gloeggler (thejaneaustenquilt.com)

July 21: Carrie Bloomston (suchitysuch.blogspot.com/ Cath
erine Redford (catherineredford.com)

July 22: Sue Reno (suereno.blogspot.com)/ Rebekah Meier (rebekahmeier.com)

July 23: Lyric Kinard (lyrickinard.com/blog) / Margie Ullery (ribboncandyquilts.blogspot.com)

July 24: Cheryl Sleboda (muppin.com/wordpress/) / Jane Sassaman (janesassaman.com/weblog)/ Julie Creus (http://todera.blogspot.com/)

July 25: Susan Brubaker Knapp (bluemoonriver.blogspot.com)


You can buy the DVD set here if you just can’t wait for every episode to air!

Quilting Arts TV Blog Hop

In celebration of QUILTING ARTS TV new season with a brand new hostess, the lovely and talented Susan Brubaker Knapp, we are having a blog hop.

1509989_10202438954394093_1484492068_nFind your inner artist and creativity as you pop on over to each link and get a preview of what is coming up this season.

July 18: Vivika DeNegre at quiltingdaily.com

July 19: Luana Rubin (luanarubin.typepad.com)/Linda Friedman (lindasartquilts.blogspot.com)

July 20: Sarah Ann Smith (sarahannsmith.com/weblog)/Karen Gloeggler (thejaneaustenquilt.com)

July 21: Carrie Bloomston (suchitysuch.blogspot.com/ Catherine Redford (catherineredford.com)

July 22: Sue Reno (suereno.blogspot.com)/ Rebekah Meier (rebekahmeier.com)

July 23: Lyric Kinard (lyrickinard.com/blog) / Margie Ullery (ribboncandyquilts.blogspot.com)

July 24: Cheryl Sleboda (muppin.com/wordpress/) / Jane Sassaman (janesassaman.com/weblog)

July 25: Susan Brubaker Knapp (bluemoonriver.blogspot.com)

(I’ll be giving away something FUN on my day, so make sure to stop by on the 23rd!)

behind the scenes: filming for Quilting Arts TV

I had the great privilege a couple of weeks ago of heading up to the still frozen north to spend a day filming for series 1400 (and a segment for series 1500 too) of Quilting Arts TV which airs on PBS. I’ve done it before (series 400 and 1100) but it’s been a while. There were some familiar faces and some new ones. I love and greatly miss the talented Pokey Bolton to whom I owe a great debt of gratitude. She built Quilting Arts Magazine and the TV show into something truly amazing. Now she has moved on to new and wonderful things and we will have a new hostess for the show.

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I’ve got to to admit, I did the happy dance right in the middle of an airport when I heard the news that Susan Brubaker Knapp was offered the position. They couldn’t have chosen a more talented, gracious, and smart woman to fill Pokey’s (adorable, high heeled) shoes. She is one of my favorite people! And so of course I said “yes, I can fit it into my schedule” when she asked if I’d like to film a segment or two even though I was teaching that week, chaperoning an out of town field trip, and getting the family ready for a spring break beach trip all at the same time. Can you say, “insane?” Getting all of the materials and projects, and especially the “step-outs” ready took a couple of weeks worth of crazy work and of course, I crammed it right up until the last minute – stitching and beading on the airplane.IMG_8489

 

 

 

Once I arrived it was all happy time! The “green room” which is no longer actually green, is where all the guests get set up and hang out while waiting for their time on set. It’s so much fun to arrive and see people you know and love! (And some you’ve actually met in person before!) Sarah Ann Smith was filming, as were Sue Reno and Jane Sassaman. I unpacked my suitcase and made sure everything was there for my three segments then settled in and watched the show. Kind of literally. There is a set monitor in the green room so that we can see what is being filmed. They shoot segments all day then one of the guests stays with the production crew to film an instructional video that evening. It can be a very long day for them!

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Speaking of the crew – I talked my way into the production booth for a few segments. I am one of those people who is always fascinated by the way things work. I spend more time watching the special features on movie discs than the actual movies. In this booth there are four people. One that you can’t see has her own monitor and keeps close track of timing. Each segment needs to be an exact amount of time. She tells the producer that it’s one minute, four minutes, etc. as the film rolls. The guy with all the fun buttons and the big fancy screen with a bunch of windows to watch all at once is controlling which camera is on. He is talking to the camera guys cueing which one will be on and when to switch. The guy in the corner is the sound technician. He mikes everyone up then listens for trouble like someone’s bracelet clinking on the table. Kathie Stull is the producer and has a mike through which she speaks into Susan’s ear throughout the filming, telling her not to forget to show certain things, how much time she has left, and what to say at the end of the set.image
The next day we all arrive early in the morning for make-up and make sure our wardrobe works with whatever Susan is wearing for any particular segment. You should see the chart she has to follow – changing her outfit (and jewelry) multiple times each day according to which segment they are filming. Because the guests have complicated travel schedules they can’t just film the whole show in order. The day before Jeanne, the Bernina rep who camps out all week to make sure everyone has what they need for the machines pulled out whatever machine feet and accessories I needed for my segments and let me play on the machines for a bit. When it is my turn to film a crew carries out my supplies, Jeanne, in her spiky high heels hefts out and sets up the machine, and we get ready to go. Kathie, the producer runs through what we will be covering and always has really good directions for making the segment flow well. The mike guy is snaking wires through our clothes and taping mikes and cords here and there. Susan is trying to stay on her feet at the end of a very long week, and the camera guy is handing me a tissue for my suddenly allergic and drippy nose. There are three or four other Quilting Arts staff people there all doing various things while trying to also meet their publishing deadlines. It’s quite the…. well. Quite the PRODUCTION!1509989_10202438954394093_1484492068_n

But most of all, it’s good fun. Sharing this fabulous world of fabric with you all! I truly have the best job in the world!

 

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