tutorial: using the Snapseed app with appliqué in mind

Or – “how I use Snapseed to alter a photo I’ve already taken so that it is easier to turn that photo into a pattern for appliqué” but that was too long for the title bar.

When you are going to make a pattern from a photo, especially a simple appliquéd portrait, You need to figure out where the darks and lights in the face are. Faces aren’t usually dark and light delineated so running the photo through a filter makes it a lot easier to see.

You can take a photo through the Snapseed App but I find it much easier to take all the photos I want with my device’s regular camera then to import just the one I want to filter.

The very first time you open the app you will most likely need to give it permission to access your photos and your camera. Go ahead and do it.

Now you will be prompted to open a picture. You have options. You can click the camera button and take your own picture right in the app. If you don’t like it you can cancel and try again. I find it quicker and easier to just open a picture I’ve already taken so I choose the first option and “open from device.” Unless of course I see the photo I want on the slider there and then I just tap that.

 

If you tap “Open from Device” you will get the chance to choose which photo album you want. Click through until you find the photo you want and tap it.

Now you see the photo you want all big and pretty. Pretty silly in this case. My little guy has been called monkey boy for ages. He was scaling cabinets and climbing to the top of unreachable places by the time he was a year old. 

Now – we want to turn this silly face into something easily transferrable into a pattern. Click that big pencil icon on the lower right.

This will bring up your Tools. Feel free to crop the image if you’d like. I usually click on the very first tool, Tune Image.

Now you are in working mode. You can change all kinds of stuff here and if you like it you click the check box on the right. If you don’t you click the X on the left. If you want to compare your original to your changes hold the slider icon on the upper right.

Touch and hold anywhere in the photo and a tools screen will pop up. These are all the changes you can play with. Slide your finger up and down to choose what change you want to make, then slide your finger to the left and right to make the change. You will notice at the very top of your screen it will tell you which change you are making and give you a bar and number to let you know how far up or down from the original you have moved. I always start by punching up the brightness.

See up at the top? I’ve now also punched up the contrast by about 51%.

For pattern making it helps to see pure value (light/dark) instead of color so I slide the saturation all the way to the left. I usually head back up to brightness and contrast and sometimes play with shadows as well.

He looks scary now as well as goofy – but I can see dark blacks against bright lights. This is a good place to stop. See that checkmark on the bottom right? Now I click it and I’m back to the home screen with the tools pencil on the lower right that we saw before. If you made a mistake and didn’t want to keep these changes go up to the upper right and click the stack with the back arrow icon.

This will give you the chance to undo just the last change, start over (revert), or take a look at all the different edits you’ve made.

I’m fine with this edit and am done so I’ll click Save. Now I have a choice. I usually Export. This makes a plain copy that is easy to open in another app and doesn’t use up as much data as the second or first options. 

Open your photos and goofy boy is there, ready to print and take to my light box, or to play with in Paper Camera (see this tutorial) or a sketch program (tutorial coming soon.)

playing with pictures – favorite apps

kinard_feathers_01original

kinard_feathers_03Snapseed

kinard_feathers_04Paper Camera 1

kinard_feathers_05Paper Camera 2

kinard_feathers_07Maku Hanga

Waterlogue

for your inspiration: rocket fizz

So there is a new store in my town called RocketFizz. Little guy and I stopped in out of curiosity and oh, did our eyes do quite a bit of goggling. Candy. Soda. Funky advertisements.
rocket_fizz3

 

Who knew there were so many kinds of soda in the world!?! Look at some of those flavors: cookie dough, hot ginger.

rocket_fizz2

Pumpkin Patch, etc. We actually bought one called “Kitty Piddle” (it was a pineapple flavor) and “Swamp Juice.”rocket_fizz1

And yes, there was a bacon-loving batman mannequin front and center.rocket_fizz4

The photos were all played with using the Snapseed App.

iPad Photo Fun – Snapseed

Screen Shot 2014-06-05 at 12.21.17 PMI’ve had a few requests to show my workflow/process as I play with my photo apps on my iPhone or iPad. So here you go.

One of my first favorites was Snapseed. (Which I believe is also available for Android users.) You take your photo as usual then open the app on your device and start messing around. I don’t spend time on games on my divides – well – Sudoku once in a very great while. The few games on my devices are there for children to play ONLY when we are waiting in a Dr’s examining room or somewhere that they aren’t involved in the main event andmust sit still and behave for more than 30 minutes. (I’m such a mean mom!)

Open the app then choose a photo from your library. You also have the option to take a photo right in the app but I find them to be much lower quality than those taken the regular way. The original photo is always still there, when you save your altered photo it saves as a new copy.coneflower1

My “go-to” first process is to click Tune Image then numb up the Ambiance, then adjust the Contrast, Brightness, and Saturation a bit. Click Apply when you are happy with what you have. If you are playing and like a photo at any step simply save it then move on. If you apply a filter and don’t like it you can open the most recent saved version and mess with it from there.

photo 1-2

Then the real fun begins. In this photo, sort of humdrum, I’ll play with Center Focus. I move the blue dot and expand the circle so that the flower is centered then mess with the inner and outer brightness and blur strength.photo 2-2

Now it’s time to get funky. The Grunge filter has about a thousand variations that you can slide through and you can also vary the strength of the Texture, Saturation, Contrast, etc. In this case I think I’m going to Crop the image so the petals aren’t quite so much centered. I always like a little more visual space on the side the subject seems to be “looking” towards.photo 3-2

 And just for fun, here are a few more workflows….

photo 1-1original photo of the Smithsonian Castle

photo 3-1
Drama filter

photo 2-1Tune Image adjustments

photo 4-1
Tilt-Shift filter

photo 5Frame

Apps for Artists – Snapseed

My favorite time killer these days is to play with my photos on my iphone. A very useful app is Snapseed.

Here is the original photo…. good enough.

If I remember right – this is a “Drama” filter – kind of an HDR thing.

There is a “Black and White” filter as well.

You can add frames, boost contrast, crop… all sorts of things to play with. The learning curve is quite a bit shorter than I expected as well. Have fun with it!

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